Comedy

The Snow Queen, Theatre N16 (London) - Review

Certain classic children’s stories automatically make one think of winter or Christmas – John Masefield’s The Box of Delights, Oscar Wilde’s The Happy Prince, and Hans Christian Anderson’s The Little Match Girl to name but a few. Using another classic Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale as a jumping off point, Theatre N16’s version of The Snow Queen – which is adapted and directed by Tatty Hennessy with co-direction by Scott Ellis – follows the familiar route of Greta making a northbound trek to try and find her missing brother Kay.

Author's review: 
4

Day Job, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

Devised by female-led Fanny Pack Theatre, and written and directed by Evi Stamatiou, Day Job is a comedy that beneath its humour has some serious comments to make about society’s relationship to work, especially if you’re a woman. Using the bus ride to/from work as a focus point, four women attempt to reconcile the practicalities of work with their long-term aspirations – or at the very least muse over the matter.

Author's review: 
4

Her Aching Heart, Hope Theatre - Review

A successful playwright for the past 40 years, Bryony Lavery needs little introduction. While her plays often having underlying feminist themes and rich in female roles, Lavery's Her Aching Heart (which was originally written in 1992) is a light-hearted affair, perfect for this time of year.

Author's review: 
5

Response to Removal Men Open Letter

Every day our news feeds are dominated by images of suffering. Twenty first century journalism can creep into every dark corner of the world. Where has this left us? I think, in a state of ‘removal’, in a state of numbness. It is saturating our capacity to feel anything. Never has this world needed more the disgusting absurdity of 2016 represented on a stage. And that is why Removal Men is happening.

Author's review: 
0

Flag, Rich Mix - Review

Performance artist Katy Dye explores the thorny issue of patriotism and the layers of meaning associated with the Union Jack – especially in post-referendum Britain.

Author's review: 
4

January listings 2017

The following events in January 2017 are on the whole either written by, organised or directed by women or gender equal productions…

Author's review: 
0

Love, Sex and Other Apps, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

It's been quite a while since I've come across a brand new writer (at least on my radar) who has impressed me with their originality and 'voice'. Michelle Sewell is such a person. Her double bill of plays at Bread & Roses Theatre makes for an entertaining and thought-provoking 90 minutes. I half-expected the evening to jump straight into a play about dating apps, but I was very pleasantly surprised to be confronted by a play that looked at 'love' from an unconventional angle – and something very topical to boot. Both plays were directed by Lydia Parker.

Author's review: 
4

Women Centre Stage: Power Play - New Women, Hampstead Theatre - Review

The early evening slot of Women Centre Space at Hampstead Theatre on 20th November 2016, saw even more people turn up for inspiring, new female-led theatre. The New Women programme featured three very different pieces, but each were as remarkable  as they were entertaining.

Author's review: 
4

Women Centre Stage: Power Play - PRIDE and Prejudice, Hampstead Theatre - Review

Last Sunday (20th November 2016) was a marathon day for showcasing female-led theatre. Organised by Sphinx Theatre, Women Centre Space is an annual, all-day event and in the past it has taken place at the National Theatre on London's South Bank. However, this year  (after week-long workshops at the The Actor's Centre) it has taken place at Hampstead Theatre, where 100 cast, writers and directors took part.

Author's review: 
5

HAP, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

Conventional wisdom says happiness is the end goal for everyone. But what if there is something else that supersedes this?

Author's review: 
4

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