Welcome to Female Arts Magazine

Activists for Gender Equality in the Arts since 2011.

Female Arts magazine is a gender equality publication, our office is at the South Street Arts Centre in Reading, UK. We also produce new writing performances and run creative writing workshops see: About Us

Our vision is for all creative women to be equally heard and seen in the Performing Arts, Visual Arts and Literary Arts. Please join our Friend scheme from £30 a year (£10 for students / low income) to help us continue our work promoting gender equality in the arts or make a one-off donation.

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Recent articles

Little Pieces of Gold: Where Are We Now, Southwark Playhouse - Review

Without a doubt, the decision by the 51% of the UK population who bothered to vote to leave the EU, left many – including myself – angry and bewildered. Almost immediately, naked aggression has come to the fore with an 78% rise in race hate crimes. Hot on its heels, the British government toyed with different ideas and legislation to curtail levels of immigration and to scrutinise the levels of non-British personnel working for British firms. The latest Little Pieces of Gold event run by Suzette Coon deals with the ramifications of Brexit and all the concerns raised above. As you might expect, it makes for unnerving viewing, especially as some of the more satirical pieces when written earlier this year, have borne out to be true in time.

Author's review: 
4

The Shadow Or In The Shelter Festival, Colour House Theatre

Last month saw Green Curtain Theatre's The Shadow or in the Shelter Festival take place in London. Taking its name from a speech that Irish President Michael D Higgins gave in 2014 – “Ireland and Britain live both in the shadow and in the shelter of one another, and so it has been since the dawn of history.” – the festival examines the lives of Irish men and women who travelled to London, from 1916 to the present day. Of the six plays in the festival, five were written by women.

Author's review: 
4

Inter Pares Project, Blue Elephant Theatre Review

This is my first review for a dance piece of theatre, which ignited my inner (very deep down) prima ballerina! I was thrilled to go to the Blue Elephant Theatre to watch two contemporary dancers, Julie Havelund-Willett and Agnese Lanza perform their self-choreographed show, Inter Pares Project.

Author's review: 
3

A Pacifist’s Guide to the War on Cancer, National Theatre - Review

Allegedly, when Native American medicine men talk to the sick, they usually ask three questions: When was the last time you sang? When was the last time you danced? When was the last time you told your story? Whether she was conscious of this notion or not, theatremaker Bryony Kimmings has adopted this practise for her latest show, to address and throw light on one of the most pernicious of diseases: cancer.

Author's review: 
4

Confessional, Southwark Playhouse - Review

There's something about plays set in pubs/bar that naturally brings with it a sense of melancholy and a gathering of disparate characters. Tennessee Williams – long known for writing some of the stage's most iconic female characters – like most artists had his successes and works that were less performed during his lifetime. Tramp Theatre Company have taken Confessional, one of Williams' lesser works – and transposed it to a coastal town in Essex. Starring Lizzie Stanton, she plays Leona Dawson, a beautician who has more than her hands full with her Bill (Gavin Brocker), her fella with the roaming eye. If he wasn't enough to contend with, the play takes place on the anniversary of Leona's brother's death, someone she was once very close to. Still wrought at his passing, she plays Tchaikovsky's Serenade Melancholique on the jukebox because it reminds her of his talents as a musician.

Author's review: 
3

A Taste of Honey.

Formed in 2012 with the vision of bringing celebrated plays to a wider audien

Author's review: 
5

OIL, Almeida Theatre - Review

Historically, epic tales that span many years and places are told from a male perspective. Yes, there examples to the contrary, but even with stories like Moll Flanders and Anna Karenina, they are examples of a woman not following the path of women in 'polite society'. Tracing the use of oil (as a global means of power from the late 19th - mid-21st century) Carrie Cracknell has artfully brought to life Ella Hickson's pioneering play, which tethers the rise and decline of this fossil fuel with civilisation – and more importantly, a mother's relationship with her daughter.

Author's review: 
4

Left Luggage, Space Arts Centre - Review

Written by Isla Gray, Left Luggage centres on two sisters who have to deal with the funeral arrangements of their late-grandmother.

Author's review: 
4

After Three Sisters, Brockley Jack Theatre Review

Wow! Fringe Theatre at it's best!

Author's review: 
5

A Guide To Second Date Sex, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

"I would get you a glass but... they're still in the shops."

Author's review: 
4

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