Princess - Theatre Review

Stuart Saint brings his passion project ‘Princess’ to Lost Theatre - a multidisciplinary offering labelled 'gig-theatre'.

Author's review: 
3

Relatively Speaking - Theatre Review

A lovely bit of Ayckbourn! As comforting as watching sitcoms on a Sunday.

Author's review: 
4

London Stories: Made By Migrants, BAC - Review

A few days  ago, the world was reeling with the news of Donald Trump elected as the President of the United States. Coupled with the Brexit result in the summer, the global lurch to the Right with its jingoistic rhetoric about 'migrants', things look as bleak as can be. With this in mind I went to a show at Battersea Arts Centre, where various people who have moved to London tell their life story. Some arrived quite recently, others 50+ years ago – but all have an interesting tale to tell.

Author's review: 
4

Strindberg's Women, Jermyn Street Theatre - Review

Those who made their name in the late 19th century set the tone for the evolution of drama the following century. While many of Henrik Ibsen's plays focused on women in all their complexity, fellow Scandinavian Strindberg focused on the psychological battle of the sexes. Currently running at Jermyn Street Theatre are two of Strindberg's lesser known works, running as a double bill. The first (The Stronger) is notable for having two female characters, one of whom doesn't get around to speaking throughout. Much like Dolly, the talkative friend in Brief Encounter who doesn't let Laura get a word in edgeways, Sara Griffths as Madame X dominates the conversation. Mademoiselle Y (Abbiegale Duncan) instead uses non-verbal communication to register her what she's thinking or feeling.

Author's review: 
4

Unanchored, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

Written and directed by Lisa Sillaway, Unanchored is an astute play that subliminally comments on the world today through its historical setting. Set during the American War of Independence, the action takes place on a prison ship off the East Coast. Under the watchful eye of 'the Captain' (Dave Mattless), Katherine Rodden as Emma 'the Leper' is kept prisoner in isolation. A suspected spy for the Loyalist/British forces, duress and kindness are used to try to persuade her to divulge what she knows and switch sides...

Author's review: 
4

Brutus and Other Heroines by Harriet Walter, Book Review

Why is the exploration of gender in Shakespeare such an important triumph and talking point? It could be the fact that Shakespeare never wrote his roles for women in the mind that they would one day be played by a female actor rather than boys in dresses. He simply did not live in a time where that would be possible. It could also be the fact that out of 981 characters that Shakespeare wrote, only 155 are women, which accounts for 16% of all roles.

Harriet Walter’s new book, Brutus and Other Heroines, explores the idea (and some would argue, FACT) that the women in Shakespeare’s plays unfortunately “only matter in as much as they relate to the men.”

Author's review: 
5

Little Pieces of Gold: Where Are We Now, Southwark Playhouse - Review

Without a doubt, the decision by the 51% of the UK population who bothered to vote to leave the EU, left many – including myself – angry and bewildered. Almost immediately, naked aggression has come to the fore with an 78% rise in race hate crimes. Hot on its heels, the British government toyed with different ideas and legislation to curtail levels of immigration and to scrutinise the levels of non-British personnel working for British firms. The latest Little Pieces of Gold event run by Suzette Coon deals with the ramifications of Brexit and all the concerns raised above. As you might expect, it makes for unnerving viewing, especially as some of the more satirical pieces when written earlier this year, have borne out to be true in time.

Author's review: 
4

The Shadow Or In The Shelter Festival, Colour House Theatre

Last month saw Green Curtain Theatre's The Shadow or in the Shelter Festival take place in London. Taking its name from a speech that Irish President Michael D Higgins gave in 2014 – “Ireland and Britain live both in the shadow and in the shelter of one another, and so it has been since the dawn of history.” – the festival examines the lives of Irish men and women who travelled to London, from 1916 to the present day. Of the six plays in the festival, five were written by women.

Author's review: 
4

Inter Pares Project, Blue Elephant Theatre Review

This is my first review for a dance piece of theatre, which ignited my inner (very deep down) prima ballerina! I was thrilled to go to the Blue Elephant Theatre to watch two contemporary dancers, Julie Havelund-Willett and Agnese Lanza perform their self-choreographed show, Inter Pares Project.

Author's review: 
3

A Pacifist’s Guide to the War on Cancer, National Theatre - Review

Allegedly, when Native American medicine men talk to the sick, they usually ask three questions: When was the last time you sang? When was the last time you danced? When was the last time you told your story? Whether she was conscious of this notion or not, theatremaker Bryony Kimmings has adopted this practise for her latest show, to address and throw light on one of the most pernicious of diseases: cancer.

Author's review: 
4

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