Festival

Unanchored, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

Written and directed by Lisa Sillaway, Unanchored is an astute play that subliminally comments on the world today through its historical setting. Set during the American War of Independence, the action takes place on a prison ship off the East Coast. Under the watchful eye of 'the Captain' (Dave Mattless), Katherine Rodden as Emma 'the Leper' is kept prisoner in isolation. A suspected spy for the Loyalist/British forces, duress and kindness are used to try to persuade her to divulge what she knows and switch sides...

Author's review: 
4

DIVA, Artworks - work-in-progress

Experiencing misunderstanding and disrespect regarding her ethnicity and sexuality for most of her adult life, Ariane Barnes has a lot of experiences to draw from. Born of parents from British-Mauritian parents descent, Barnes is hard to pigeon-hole. Not that anyone should, of course, but actors in general get labelled and put in boxes – especially when they have to use ubiquitous sites like Spotlight to reach every possible demographic.

Author's review: 
0

INTERVIEW: ALICE MARSHALL

After a fantastic debut at the 2016 Edinburgh Fringe with packed houses and 5 star reviews, critically acclaimed comedy actress and character comedian Alice Marshall presents a collection of weird and wonderful characters in the London transfer of her show.

Author's review: 
0

WOMEN CENTRE STAGE: POWERPLAY - Theatre Festival

Women Centre Stage develops and commissions new work of artistic excellence which uniquely brings together a diverse array of women characters far from the margins into centre stage.

Author's review: 
0

Brutus and Other Heroines by Harriet Walter, Book Review

Why is the exploration of gender in Shakespeare such an important triumph and talking point? It could be the fact that Shakespeare never wrote his roles for women in the mind that they would one day be played by a female actor rather than boys in dresses. He simply did not live in a time where that would be possible. It could also be the fact that out of 981 characters that Shakespeare wrote, only 155 are women, which accounts for 16% of all roles.

Harriet Walter’s new book, Brutus and Other Heroines, explores the idea (and some would argue, FACT) that the women in Shakespeare’s plays unfortunately “only matter in as much as they relate to the men.”

Author's review: 
5

STRAWBERRY VALE 2.0 - Ovalhouse (work-in-progress)

The use of computers and digital technology projections in theatrical has been steadily increasing in recent years. While the likes of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and The Nether have helped with awareness of the limits of its use, the real questions paradoxically are can its use ever feel 'organic' to a production and does digital tech ever fall in danger of sacrificing humanity for sophistication?

Author's review: 
0

Little Pieces of Gold: Where Are We Now, Southwark Playhouse - Review

Without a doubt, the decision by the 51% of the UK population who bothered to vote to leave the EU, left many – including myself – angry and bewildered. Almost immediately, naked aggression has come to the fore with an 78% rise in race hate crimes. Hot on its heels, the British government toyed with different ideas and legislation to curtail levels of immigration and to scrutinise the levels of non-British personnel working for British firms. The latest Little Pieces of Gold event run by Suzette Coon deals with the ramifications of Brexit and all the concerns raised above. As you might expect, it makes for unnerving viewing, especially as some of the more satirical pieces when written earlier this year, have borne out to be true in time.

Author's review: 
4

Inter Pares Project, Blue Elephant Theatre Review

This is my first review for a dance piece of theatre, which ignited my inner (very deep down) prima ballerina! I was thrilled to go to the Blue Elephant Theatre to watch two contemporary dancers, Julie Havelund-Willett and Agnese Lanza perform their self-choreographed show, Inter Pares Project.

Author's review: 
3

A Pacifist’s Guide to the War on Cancer, National Theatre - Review

Allegedly, when Native American medicine men talk to the sick, they usually ask three questions: When was the last time you sang? When was the last time you danced? When was the last time you told your story? Whether she was conscious of this notion or not, theatremaker Bryony Kimmings has adopted this practise for her latest show, to address and throw light on one of the most pernicious of diseases: cancer.

Author's review: 
4

Confessional, Southwark Playhouse - Review

There's something about plays set in pubs/bar that naturally brings with it a sense of melancholy and a gathering of disparate characters. Tennessee Williams – long known for writing some of the stage's most iconic female characters – like most artists had his successes and works that were less performed during his lifetime. Tramp Theatre Company have taken Confessional, one of Williams' lesser works – and transposed it to a coastal town in Essex. Starring Lizzie Stanton, she plays Leona Dawson, a beautician who has more than her hands full with her Bill (Gavin Brocker), her fella with the roaming eye. If he wasn't enough to contend with, the play takes place on the anniversary of Leona's brother's death, someone she was once very close to. Still wrought at his passing, she plays Tchaikovsky's Serenade Melancholique on the jukebox because it reminds her of his talents as a musician.

Author's review: 
3

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