Fringe

Tanja, Camden People's Theatre - Review

One of the last times I was at Camden People's Theatre was for E15, a show about vulnerable mothers in Newham who are being rehoused outside of the capital. This week the venue has been home to Strawberry Blonde Curls Theatre's show. With its use of verbatim theatre, its themes of the displacement of women and challenging the practices of the status quo, it certainly complements previous productions that highlight the plight of vulnerable women. Written by Rosie MacPherson and directed by Hannah Butterfield, Tanja tells the story of a woman, one of many who are 'housed' at Yarl's Wood detention centre in Befordshire for female asylum seekers.

Author's review: 
4

Review: Give Me Your Skin (Work-In-Progress)

“Calm Down Dear: Camden People's Theatre's annual festival of feminism return

Author's review: 
4

Interview: Rebecca Manson Jones

We interviewed Rebecca Manson Jones at the start of the summer, just before the GLA elections when she was standing for the Women’s Equality Party (WEP). Five months on and the campaigning is still going strong as she’s now about to stand in the Lewisham by-election, for Brockley Ward. When she’s not out campaigning with WEP, she’s also making theatre, which naturally links to her politics. Here she talks about both with Female Arts’ Amie Taylor.

Author's review: 
0

Can You Hear Me Running? The Pleasance - Review

Losing any one of your five primary senses is particularly devastating, but to lose one's voice (especially as an actor) is unimaginable. Written by Jo Harper, Can You Hear Me Running? is based on Louise Breckon Richards' own journals about the road to running the London Marathon – an unusual means to recovering her voice after a rare condition.

Author's review: 
3

Acorn, Courtyard Theatre - Review

The compulsion to tell stories is as old as mankind itself. In fact it this, among other things, that sets humans apart from the rest of the animal kingdom. Written by Maud Dromgoole and directed by Tatty Hennessy,  Acorn looks at how this primeval urge and how it's been sublimated in 21st century culture.

Author's review: 
3

Listings, November 2016

The following events in November 2016 are on the whole either written by, organised or directed by women or gender equal productions…

Author's review: 
0

Putting Women Centre Stage: Madhuri Shekar Interview

Madhuri Shekar is an American-born, Indian-raised playwright who has just been named as “one to watch” by American Theatre. Her play In Love And Warcraft won the 2013/2014 Kendeda Graduate Playwriting award and has since been produced throughout the USA. Following the on and off line life of college senior Evie, the romantic comedy explores a range of contemporary and age-old topics such as gaming and sexual expectations within relationships. With two female leads and entirely relatable characters, it’s a refreshing narrative to life in the 21st Century.

Author's review: 
0

Plastic Figurines, New Diorama Theatre - Review

Written by Ella Carmen Greenhill and based on her own experiences with her autisic brother, Plastic Figurines is a personal play – one that couples a sensitivity to the the subject matter with the capacity to look at the unvarnished truth. As the fictional brother and sister Rosie and Mikey, Vanessa Schofield and Jamie Samuel only have each other to rely on after the death of their mother.

Author's review: 
4

The We Plays, Hope Theatre - Review

A gender-balanced evening of insightful monologues, The We Plays show once again that whether they are male or female, writer Andrew Maddock has a knack for creating well-rounded believable characters, whose circumstances are relatable yet unpredictable.

Author's review: 
4

Interview: Culture Clash

We interviewed CultureClash Theatre last year whilst their play Hannah and Hanna was running at the Fringe. This year they're back, and currently performing a new piece 'Under My Thumb' at Greenwich Theatre. This week Female Arts' Amie Taylor ran a Q and A with Serin Ibrahim and Cassie Hercules of CultureClash Theatre.

Author's review: 
0

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