Fringe

Imogen, Shakespeare's Globe - Review

The hallmark of Emma Rice's inaugural season as Artistic Director at the Globe has been drawing out the feminine experience from Shakespeare's canon. Imogen (or rather "Cymbeline renamed and reclaimed") places the focus firmly on the Cymbeline's daughter rather than the monarch whose rash actions precipitates the play's unfortunate chain of events.

Author's review: 
4

Interview: Isley Lynn

Isley Lynn's play Skin a Cat was a huge success at Vault Fest this year, receiving 4 and 5 stars across the board. This October it returns to The Bunker (London), Female Arts' Amie Taylor caught up with Isley to find out more about this piece.

Author's review: 
0

Encounters Festival - Incredibly Moving

Women feature prominently in this year’s festival.

Author's review: 
4

The Seagull, Or Why Masha Always Wears Black, CPT - Review

Almost a year ago to the week, the female-led This Is Not A Test theatre company performed Three Sisters at Royal Central School of Speech and Drama –  a postmodern meta-critique of one of Chekhov's most famous plays. This year, Chekhov has also been a source of inspiration, but this time drawing from another of his canon, The Seagull. Directed by Rebecca Reeves and performed by Maria Creasey (with support by Benjamin Victor as Medvedenko), The Seagull, Or Why Masha Always Wears Black is just as inventive as its predecessor, but in some ways more intimate.

Author's review: 
4

Motion, Theatre Utopia, Matthew's Yard - Review

Written and performed by Sally Reichart and Rosie Frecker, Motion charts one teenager's journey from enjoying keeping fit, to embracing competitiveness and the lengths that staying on top can involve.

Author's review: 
3

Queen Lear, Tristan Bates Theatre Review

Having never seen Shakespeare’s King Lear before, it was with great anticipation that I sat down to watch the reprise of the original 2014 production of Queen Lear, directed and adapted by Phil Willmott.

Author's review: 
3

Interview: Rosie Wyatt

Rosie Wyatt is an actor, feminist and lover of stories.

Author's review: 
0

October Listings 2016

The following events in October 2016 are on the whole either written by, organised or directed by women or gender equal productions…

Author's review: 
0

Tarantella, Clapham Omnibus - Review

Written and directed by Elizabeth Bowe, Tarantella tells the story of three generations of Sicilians living under the same roof in New York at the end of the Second World War. Tradition continues to play a big part in family life and the community at large...

Author's review: 
4

Our Baby, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

The examination of marital strife within stage drama goes together like eggs and bacon, death and taxes.  A Doll's House. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?... Written by Elenora Fusco and directed by Katharina Kastening, Our Baby is very much a part of this grand tradition, with its unforgettable portrayal of a couple's fractured relationship and the child they may... or may not have...   

Author's review: 
4

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