Dance

Bare, Courtyard Theatre - Review

Judging by the number of shows I’ve seen in recent years that have been devised by graduates of East 15, the acting school has proven to be adept at nurturing tomorrow’s theatre-makers. Last week at the Courtyard Theatre, three of East 15’s alumni hosted an evening of female-led monologues, all written and performed by the artists themselves.
 

Author's review: 
4

Veils, Women And War Festival - Review

"Cairo rules... don't stop, don't run, don't make eye contact."
Samar, Veils.

Author's review: 
5

Waking Beauty, Ovalhouse - Review

'Once upon a time'... fairy tales were popular stories to tell children.

Author's review: 
4

Creampie, Theatre N16 - The Bedford, Balham - Review

"God bless the internet."
American Pie

Author's review: 
4

The Masks of Aphra Behn - Review

The first professional female playwright. A spy for King Charles II during the maritime Anglo-Dutch War. If all the world's a stage and one [man] in his times plays many parts, then Aprah Behn had some of the most interesting roles of all. No housebound housewife duties for her, Behn enjoyed more freedom in the 17th century than women of almost any social rank.

Author's review: 
4

Fury, Soho Theatre - Review

Phaedra, Cassandra, Helen, Antigone. Think about any notable woman in Greek legends, and there lies a story about a wronged woman who then acts on impulse and then condemned by gods and men alike. Of all these women, perhaps the most notorious is Medea, the mother who slew her own children. In today's society, little has changed in so far as mothers who are seen to be derelict in their maternal duties are social pariahs and none more so than the single mother.

Using Medea as a jumping-off point, playwright Phoebe Eclair-Powell explores the notion of the stigmatised mother in urban Britain, challenging the audiences mores –asking  whether they are really as sympathetic as they think they are to those who have fallen within the cracks of society. With direction by Hannah Hauer-King (of Dry Land fame), their partnership has given birth to a play that gets under the skin of society's outward manners and decorum.

Author's review: 
4

THROUGH THE MILL, Southwark Playhouse - Review

There aren't many Hollywood stars nowadays that are known for their natural singing prowess. A few that have been roped into cinematic outings such as Les Miserables perhaps, but none you could bank on hearing, year in year out. Between the 1930s-60s, movies were replete with all-singing and acting entertainers, back in days where musicals were the most popular genre of movies. And one of its greatest exponents is arguably Judy Garland.

Author's review: 
5

A Year From Now, Tristan Bates Theatre - Review

Another year and then you'd be happy
Just one more year and then you'd be happy
But you're crying, you're crying now

Gerry Rafferty, Baker Street

Author's review: 
5

Pick of the Reading Fringe Festival

Our pick of film, performance, drama, comedy, music, cabaret, spoken word, musicals and other experiences at the Reading Fringe Festival 20-24th July 2016 includes Female Arts FREE review writing workshop on Sunday 10th July!

Author's review: 
0

The Sisterhood, Leicester Square Theatre - Review

Updating Molière's Les Femmes Savante to the present day, Ranjit Bolt's adaptation tackles intellectualism, the purpose of education and indirectly, feminism.

Author's review: 
4

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Dance