Dance

Queen Lear, Tristan Bates Theatre Review

Having never seen Shakespeare’s King Lear before, it was with great anticipation that I sat down to watch the reprise of the original 2014 production of Queen Lear, directed and adapted by Phil Willmott.

Author's review: 
3

October Listings 2016

The following events in October 2016 are on the whole either written by, organised or directed by women or gender equal productions…

Author's review: 
0

Tarantella, Clapham Omnibus - Review

Written and directed by Elizabeth Bowe, Tarantella tells the story of three generations of Sicilians living under the same roof in New York at the end of the Second World War. Tradition continues to play a big part in family life and the community at large...

Author's review: 
4

Our Baby, Bread & Roses Theatre - Review

The examination of marital strife within stage drama goes together like eggs and bacon, death and taxes.  A Doll's House. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?... Written by Elenora Fusco and directed by Katharina Kastening, Our Baby is very much a part of this grand tradition, with its unforgettable portrayal of a couple's fractured relationship and the child they may... or may not have...   

Author's review: 
4

Cruel Britannia, Lion & Unicorn Theatre - Review

The Lion & Unicorn Theatre has had a long association with fringe theatre productions. However Cruel Britannia at the venue, which is produced by Sharon Burrell and Ceri Lothian, takes a foray into the world of comedy and political satire.

Author's review: 
4

The Awakening, Brockley Jack Studio Theatre - Review

In today's world where atrocities are unfortunately a common feature on the news, one of the most prevalent questions raised is how should the guilty be dealt with for their crimes? Are punishment and justice always the same thing? The ancient Greeks wrestled with these questions, particularly the Ouroborous nature of cause and effect. Directed by Madeleine Moore and written by Julian Garner, The Awakening at the Brockley Jack Studio Theatre touches on these questions in a timeless, rural setting.

Author's review: 
4

Sister, Ovalhouse - Review

Every once in a while, a show will come along  that is not only ahead of the curve, it follows it's own trajectory. Such a show is Sister by Born Mad Theatre which is written and directed by Rebecca Hanbury. Utilising verbatim dialogue from nearly 50 women and girls from around the UK, these personal anecdotes are used as a starting point for a meditation on women's relationships and evolving into a transcendent ethereal soundscape.

Author's review: 
4

Travesty, New Diorama Theatre - Review

In  Italian 'travesti' doesn't mean something akin to a calamity. Instead, it is a practice of women playing 'men's' parts in plays and vice versa. Following a critically successful stint in Edinburgh, Fight In The Dog Theatre have brought their play Travesty to the New Diorama Theatre for a five-day run. Directed by Emily Burns and written by Liam Williams, Travesty revolves around a couple in their 20s – from the early days of their relationship to its death knell. "So far, so fairly conventional," you might be thinking. Except the part of Anna is played by Lydia Larsen  and the part of Ben is played by Pierro Niel-Mee.

Author's review: 
4

Katia Kvinge: Squirrel, Edinburgh Review

Possessing oodles of energy, Katia Kvinge is not your average comedian. Born of Norwegian and American descent, but spent her formative years in Scotland, Kvinge was never going to be pigeon-holed. Her sense of humour can be described as zany with a propensity for delivery at breakneck speed.

Author's review: 
3

They Drink It In The Congo, Almeida Theatre - Review

In They Drink It In The Congo at the Almeida Theatre, the tension between the guilt of the past and apprehension of the future, is palpable.

Author's review: 
4

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