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UPDATE 14th June 2019

After 8 years of supporting and promoting women in the arts Femalearts.com is ceasing activity.

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Recent articles

Phaedra(s) - Barbican Theatre Review

Sex, death and complicated family relationships are the hallmarks of a Greek tragedy. Krzysztof Warlikowski’s Phaedra(s) had all three. Times three. Co-produced by the Barbican and Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe, as part of LIFT 2016, Phaedra(s) presents three tellings of the famous Greek myth: firstly Lebanese-Canadian writer Wajdi Mouawad’s, then Sarah Kane’s Phaedra’s Love, and lastly Nobel Prize-winning South African author J.M. Coetzee’s Elizabeth Costello.

Author's review: 
4

For Those That Cry When They Hear The Foxes Scream, Tristan Bates Theatre - Review

"What would you choose? Toes for fingers or fingers for toes?" So begins Charlotte Hamblin's provacative drama For Those Who Cry When They Hear The Foxes Scream. Women's stories involving psychiactric care have proven to be fertile ground for plays, especially given the emperical evidence that even in the present day, there is a greater bias for women versus men to need care. Sarah Kane's Cleansed and 4.48 Psychosis (and Terry Johnson's Hysteria) are arguably some of the first examples of this sub-genre. Hamblin's play, while set in a psychiatric facility is actually the relationship of a gay female couple and how in this atmosphere of honesty and candour they can be frank about their own difficulties.

Author's review: 
5

Interview: Rachel Heyburn

We chat to Rachel Heyburn, founder of East of West Theatre Company, who, amongst others, previously directed Pussy Riot at the closing night of Banksy’s Dismaland and now directs the upcoming revival of The Slave by Leroi Jones (Amiri Baraka) at The Tristan Bates Theatre during Black History Month this October.

‘It really feels that now is exactly the right time for the voices of these characters to be heard again.’ – Rachel Heyburn

Author's review: 
0

Philosophy In the Bedroom

Sociologists, philosophers and Feminist activists came together at this year's How The Light Gets In festival to debate whether there is a place for philosophy in the bedroom.

Author's review: 
0

Angela Eagle: Politics and the Patriarchy

An enlightening window into the male world of Parliament from MP Angela Eagle at How the Light Gets In festival 2016

Author's review: 
0

Hurricane Katie, Leicester Square Theatre - Comedy Review

If you've ever seen Variety of Kings, the monthly comedy night near King Cross, then compère Katie Pritchard won't be a stranger to you. Always very funny, with self-deprecating humour that belies a very talented musicial performer, I've previously often wondered when I would get the chance to see her in a solo show, as she definitely deserves the chance to shine.

Author's review: 
4

LIFT Festival presents MINEFIELD by Lola Arias: Theatre Review

A remarkable example of theatre at its most redemptive; a brave excavation.

Author's review: 
5

The Yellow Wagtail, Lion and Unicorn Theatre - Review

Directed by Eloise Lally, The Yellow Wagtail offers a intimate appraisal of relationships in one's twenties. Hermione Halpin – who wrote the play as well co-stars with Tom Dixon – is the driving force behind this personal project.

Author's review: 
4

Sea Life, Hope Theatre - Review

First performed 16 years ago in Bristol, Lucy Catherine's Sea Life at the Hope Theatre marks its London premiere. With traces of Anthony Neilson's Dissocia* and Tabitha Mortiboy's Beacons in its DNA – but pre-dating both – Sea Life follows siblings Roberta, Bob and Eddie who own a pub in a permanenty 'off-season' coastal town... Except this pub is very much in use, diversified for the use of the new 'family business'.

Author's review: 
4

Northern Ballet: Jane Eyre – Dance Review

Northern Ballet present a detailed and slick adaptation of the popular novel. On tour 'til 18th June, 2016.

Author's review: 
4

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